Recipe: Homemade Velveeta

This weekend I made Velveeta. Maybe that's not what you were expecting to hear. But I did it, and I did it with less than 5 ingredients, and only using real, whole food ingredients. Real Velveeta, of course, isn't even cheese, it's a "Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product." The fact that it's found on a shelf next to the pasta rather than in a refrigerator with other dairy products has always disturbed me. So, a real food diet means goodbye Velveeta. But you have to admit, it melts like nothing else, and that's why we all love it.

In my Homemade Velveeta, I got to use one of my favorite ingredients: grass-fed gelatin. I talk about grass-fed gelatin on my blog and Facebook page quite often. I've used it in my recipes for Homemade Fruit Snacks and Real Deal Marshmallows. Grass-fed gelatin is a wonderful source of natural collagen, which means it makes hair, skin, and nails healthy. It's also good for a healthy gut; when you hear people talking about bone broth for gut healing, the natural gelatin in that broth is one of the main things they're after. I love finding ways to incorporate grass-fed gelatin!

There are other recipes online for homemade Velveeta. Most of them use man-made gelatin that is not nourishing like grass-fed gelatin. They also contain more ingredients than mine. One of them is cream of tartar. I have nothing against cream of tartar; it's an ingredient in baking powder and an ingredient I keep in my kitchen. Cream of tartar is a stabilizer, but so is grass-fed gelatin, and the gelatin is more powerful. I don't see the need for both. I omitted the cream of tartar, and the Velveeta still worked. The other ingredient in most other recipes is milk powder. Milk powder is a highly processed food and I do NOT keep that one in my kitchen. Again, I just skipped that one and I still got the end result I was looking for. Now I'm sharing this recipe with you!

Ingredients:
2 tsp. grass-fed gelatin
2 TBS. water
2 c. cheese, shredded
2/3 c. whole milk


Put the water in a small bowl and sprinkle the grass-fed gelatin on top. Let it sit for 5 minutes so it can bloom.


Shred the cheese of choice (I used raw white cheddar, but you could try anything you like) and put it in a food processor or blender.


Line a mini loaf pan with plastic wrap. This will make the Velveeta much easier to get out later.


Put the milk in a small saucepan and bring it to a boil. Whisk constantly so the milk does not scorch.


As soon as the milk starts boiling, pull it off the heat. Add the small bowl of gelatin to the saucepan and whisk it in. It might clump at first but will soon dissolve in the heat. Then, pour the milk into the food processor and blend. The heat from the milk will melt the cheese.


Pour the cheesy liquid into the mini loaf pan.


Move the loaf pan in the refrigerator and let it set up for at least 4 hours. When it is done, pull out the plastic, flip it over, and peel it off.


This Homemade Velveeta cuts like Velveeta, has the texture of Velveeta, and can be used just like Velveeta!  It melts perfectly, and if you have any leftover you can put it back the fridge and it will set up again. Mix the melted Velveeta with salsa and dip tortilla chips in it. I also like to melt it and dip French fries or sweet potato fries in it. Lately I've also been drizzling the melted Velveeta over a sunny side up egg and toast for a kind of alternative Hollandaise sauce. This is so fun to use. Be creative and enjoy!

Printable: Homemade Velveeta

55 comments:

  1. OMGoodness! This is a life-changer! ...well, at least a cooking changer. Thank You!

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  2. I am leary of pouring the warm mixture onto plastic wrap because of all the chemicals that may leach out. I think maybe a silicone loaf pan is in order.

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    1. The milk has only just begun to boil, then it sits for minute, then it's mixed with cold cheese, and then it's put immediately into the refrigerator. I think the threat of anything bad is incredibly minimal. Regardless, if you have a silicone loaf pan, go for it.

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    2. I don't buy silicon things to cook with. After the first time I licked a silicon spatula and could actually taste the silicon, that was the end of that for me. Clearly, if you can taste it, it's shedding particles.

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    3. Perhaps you got a defected item. I've never had any issues with silicone.

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  3. I don't know how many times I've tried to make a healthier version of Cheeze Whiz and Rotel tomatoes dip. And every time it's been pretty bad. I can't wait to try this! Thank you!

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  4. What a great idea. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. Ok my question is? If you cant find grass fed gelatin can you use the knox gelatin? I know it is store bought but can it be used? will it do the same thing? Does this taste like cheese?

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    1. Yes, you can technically use Knox gelatin.
      Yes, this is made of real cheese so it tastes like cheese.

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    2. I bought mine through Amazon.

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  6. How long will it last in the fridge?

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    1. It will last at least 10 days. The batch I made lasted us 10 days - although at that point it didn't go bad, we just finished it all!

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  7. If I use beautiful grass fed raw milk wouldn't heating it kill the good enzymes?

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    1. Yes, heating raw milk will kill some of the enzymes, but this is still a far cry from pasteurization. Raw milk is used in a lot of recipes because it's a far better choice than even organic, pasteurized milk.

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  8. Great idea! Us St. Louisan's have our own well known form of Velveeta; Provel! I believe it's a mixture of Swiss and Provolone, but it's incredible rich and delectable and melts like a dream. If you're not used to it, it is a little unusual at first, but it's a wonderful and delicious cheese! Our famous Imos pizza is made with it and has made the cheese famous around here. Anyway, if you're ever int he area you can always pick some of that up and use that, or I'm sure you can even have it shipped! ;)

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    1. non-toxic St. Louis galJanuary 20, 2014 at 9:45 AM

      However, that provel chess is TOXIC if it isn't made from real cheese from real (raw) milk from cows that AREN'T shot up with hormones and antibiotics. Eat it if you want, but I'll pass.

      Don't forget the point here.....Velveeta *tastes* good too.

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  9. Thank you for the recipe! The only reason I have bought Velveeta in the last years is for those dip recipes so this will be such a welcome replacement! Thank you, thank you!

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  10. Wow! thanks a lot!!! this is amazing!!!

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  11. Any chance you think this could work with dairy free alternatives like coconut milk and daiya cheese?

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    1. I have no idea, but I don't think the flavor would be good at all.

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  12. You are so crafty! I haven't had Velveeta in more than a decade for all the reasons you mention. It's nice to know if I ever wanted to make my mom's asparagus casserole that now I can with your recipe instead of the cheese non-food product. Thanks for sharing and figuring it out!!

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  13. There is nowhere on label that the gelatin is grass fed. Do you just take their word for it?

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    1. From their website:

      How are the cattle raised?
      Our cattle are grass fed and slaughtered in Argentina and Brazil which is controlled by their respective Department of Agriculture. These countries have the same type of rigourous tests and inspections as the United States. Beef hides are the only product used to manufacture gelatin in these countries.

      http://www.greatlakesgelatin.com/consumer/FAQs.php

      So yes, I take their word for it.

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    2. Both myself and 2 other food bloggers called Great Lakes and they ensured all of us that they use grass-fed beef.

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  14. I would love to use almond milk for this! Any idea if it would work or not?

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    1. I have no idea, you'll just have to try it and see.

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  15. Whst are some other uses for gelatin? I'm hesitant on buying this big container for one recipe. Thanks in advance.

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    1. Dalena, if you do a search for "gelatin" on my blog, several other recipes will pop up. In fact, the other 2 most popular recipes on my blog feature grass-fed gelatin: Homemade Fruit Snacks and Real Deal Marshmallows.

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  16. Cristina, what would you suggest to use in place of "grass fed gelatin" Have vegetarians in the family & I try to include them when we have family get togethers. Most of our family is clueless to why the choose that lifestyle & can be~~let's just say less than understanding.

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    1. I've heard that agar agar can be used in place of gelatin in some recipes, although I have not tried it myself nor do I personally recommend agar agar as a real food choice. Regardless, it might be an option to try.

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  17. So excited to find this recipe. I am going to try it. I have a great veggie-cheese soup recipe, but it uses velveeta, and grated cheese just isn't the same.

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  18. Do you know if it would work with 2% milk and 2% cheese?

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    1. I don't see why it wouldn't, but you'll just have to try it and see.

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  19. I believe Knox Gelatin used a pork product.

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  20. I know you said probably not with almond milk, but what about goat milk and goat cheese? I am allergic (NOT lactose intolerant) to all dairy and I would love to be able to make and eat the rotel tomato dip for once and also to melt and pour over chips for nachos.

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    1. I don't see why it wouldn't work, but you'll just have to try it and see.

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  21. I have been so excited ever since I stumbled upon this recipe! I ordered the gelatin, followed the recipe and had the best queso I have ever made! I can't wait to make mac and cheese, grilled cheese, queso...the list goes on! Thanks!

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  22. Oh my - are you kidding me? You mean I can eat Velveeta again? Hooray! Thanks so much for this recipe!

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  23. Do you really need a food processor? My gelatin comes today and my family is more than anxious to have some Velveeta but I don't have a food processor. I do have and immersion blender tho. Would just mixing it be enough? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

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    1. I have not tried it without a food processor, but an immersion blender sounds like it should work. How did it turn out for you?

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    2. Actually it was really grainy and sharp. I think I missed mixing the gelatin with the water. I just dumped it in the water so it was still somewhat powdery when I added it to the milk. I bought some fancy raw white cheddar which was really sharp. I'll try to find a mild cheese next time. Hopefully it works because I truly miss velveeta even tho i cant stomach it anymore! Also, I found it to be really thick when I "poured" it. Thats not how I envisioned it?

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    3. It should definitely be very thin when you pour it.

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    4. I used my immersion blender to make this and it turned out great! Love it! We can actually eat velveeta and feel good about it!!

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  24. Can this be sliced and frozen to last longer?

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    1. I have no idea but I don't think it would come out very nicely if it were frozen.

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  25. Quick question: how much does this recipe make?? So many recipes in which Velveeta is an ingredient call for a specific amount (ex.: 1 lb. Velveeta, etc.).

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    1. I don't know exactly, as I didn't measure. It fit in a mini loaf pan. It's definitely not a pound.

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  26. Just made this cheese - if you quad the recipe, it's a little more than the big block of velveeta. I mixed mild cheddar with colby and then added two cans of rotel and cooked ground beef. Can't even tell the difference!! Thank you for this recipe.

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  27. I just made this cheese and it turned out great... I love it... its nice to know that the store bought products can be made without all that extra crap in it.... thank you so much... I used the Knox gelatin because it was already pre measured 2 teaspoons per packet...everyone who wants to go fresh needs to try this...this site is now my favorite spot to be...

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  28. Did the almond milk work?!

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  29. I buy Velveeta and cringe, but it's the best for mac and cheese which I can whip up in less than 10 minutes and my kids love it. I've seen other (more complicated) recipes or ones that aren't good at melting for mac/cheese, so I'm definitely going to try this! Thanks! - Faith

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  30. When I melted it, it was really runny and didn't hold to the pasta. Any idea what I may have done wrong?

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  31. Why would you want to turn real cheese into Velveeta?

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    Replies
    1. My homemade Velveeta is healthy and nourishing. Some people like the way it melts in certain recipes. If you don't like it, don't make it.

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