Recipe: Real Deal Marshmallows

Did you know that marshmallows were originally medicinal? Marshmallows did actually used to be made from the root of the althaea officinalis (marshmallow) plant; marshmallow root was used for inflammation and as a cure for sore throats. In fact, some people today still recommend marshmallows as a cure for sore throat. However, marshmallows from the store are nothing like traditional marshmallows and will not aid in this use. Modern marshmallows are made of mostly corn syrup and blue food dye. :::blank stare::: That's right, manufacturers use blue dye to make white marshmallows. I'm just as confused as you are.

To make authentic, healthy marshmallows, all you need is honey, water, gelatin (preferably grass-fed), vanilla, and marshmallow root. The marshmallow root is optional, but makes them really authentic, and of course you do get the original health benefits! I got mine from one of my favorite online stores, Mountain Rose Herbs. The grass-fed gelatin that I use can be found here. High quality gelatin is a good source of natural collagen, and is great for hair, skin, and nails.

Without further ado, here is my recipe for Real Deal Marshmallows!

Ingredients:
1 c. water
1 TBS. marshmallow root (optional)
4 TBS. gelatin
1 c. honey
2 tsp. vanilla


Boil one cup of water and steep the marshmallow root for 15 minutes. Then, strain the herb out. Skip this step if you are not using marshmallow root.


Pour ½ cup of the water into the bowl of a stand mixer with the gelatin. You can also pour them into a large bowl and use a hand mixer. Whisk it until it's combined, then set it aside.
 

Pour the other ½ cup of water into a small saucepan with the honey. Turn the stove on medium and heat it until it reaches 230° F. You do not need to stir it. It may take a while to get to temperature, but do not be tempted to turn the heat up.


Turn on the stand mixer or a hand mixer. Very slowly drizzle in the honey while continuing to mix on a medium speed. Once all the honey is in with the gelatin, turn the mixer on high.
 

Continue to beat until the mixture turns white, marshmallowy, and soft peaks form. This will take about 5 to 10 minutes. Add the vanilla in for the last minute or so of mixing. Try not to overmix, as this will make the marshmallows hard to spread out later.


Spread the marshmallow "fluff" into a 9x13" pan greased or lined with parchment paper. Set the pan out somewhere it will not get wet (not the fridge!) and let the marshmallows set up for 8 hours.
 

Turn the finished marshmallows onto a cutting board very lightly greased with coconut oil, or sprinkled with organic powdered sugar or cornstarch. Dip a pizza cutter or knife into coconut oil and cut into strips, then into squares.


At this point, you can roll the marshmallows in finely shredded coconut, cocoa powder, etc., but I just like them plain. Store them in an air-tight container in a cool, dry place. I usually lightly grease the storage container with coconut oil. Once again, don't put them in the fridge - marshmallows melt when they get wet, which is why these are great for hot chocolate! Eat them within one week for best flavor, although mine didn't last nearly that long.


This is one of my favorite desserts. I know you'll love them as much as I do! Just be warned that you'll never want to eat a store-bought marshmallow ever again!

Printable: Real Deal Marshmallows

So fresh that smiles are guaranteed





If you order by clicking on any of my links and have never ordered from Tropical Traditions in the past, you will receive a free book on Virgin Coconut Oil, and I will receive a discount coupon for referring you.

77 comments:

  1. This is great! My daughter LOVES marshmallows, and I hate buying them because they aren't good for her. Thanks for posting a healthier version.

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  2. These look delicious and def on my 'try' list :-)

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  3. I wonder if this can be made into a spreadable "fluff" for a peanut butter and fluff sandwich treat!

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  4. @Anonymous, To make it a fluff, reduce the amount of gelatin. I would start with 2 tablespoons and see if that works.

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  5. I want to make these :) Found you on Frugal Days and I would love to have you share this on The HomeAcre Hop!
    http://www.theselfsufficienthomeacre.com/2013/01/the-homeacre-hop-3.html

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  6. I love homemade marshmallows and I've been searching for one without corn syrup. I can't wait to try these.

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  7. LOVE! Just found your blog via a pin someone had on pinterest and i also love marshmallows but I'm hardcore about keeping sugar and corn syrup (shudder) out of our diets as I'm a recovering sugar addict and my kids skitz out when they eat it. THESE sound absolutely perfect but it's just a shame the honey is heated so high as it will destroy any goodness in the raw honey. Must it be heated so high?

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  8. @rabitlittlehippy, Yes, the honey must be heated. There's no way around it. And while it does make the honey no longer raw, it doesn't suddenly make it horrible, either. I think it's still a nice and yummy treat, so much better than any other alternatives I've seen.

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  9. oh joy!!! I was already wondering how to handle bonfires and smores! Please consider sharing your recipe with us at Eco-Kids Tuesday! http://likemamalikedaughter.blogspot.com/2013/01/a-funky-junky-windchime-at-eco-kids.html

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  10. I LOVE this! My girls love marshmallows over the campfire. I'm featuring this on Eco Kids on organicaspirations.blogspot.com this week. I'm following too!

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  11. Thanks for sharing with us at Eco-Kids! I hope you will come link up with us again this week!! http://likemamalikedaughter.blogspot.com/2013/02/an-enchanted-childhood-playschool.html

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  12. Are these Gluten Free? I am new and still learning what does and doesnt contain gluten! Thanks bunches :) These look YUMMY!

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  13. There's such a thing as marshmallow root? I had no idea! This might be the best root of any root! Thanks for sharing. I will have to try this one.

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  14. You had me at honey! YUM! (I had no idea there was a marshmallow root.) Great post!

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  15. That is pretty stinkin awesome! I had no clue!!! LOVE this post!

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  16. Wow! Thank you for showing me how to make something that I can feed my kids with ingredients I can pronounce. S'mores anyone?

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  17. Wow! Pinned to "recipes I would like to try" immediately!

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  18. I made these today and they turned out fabulous! Thank you for the recipe! (which I halved by the way and it still worked!)

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  19. Does it make a difference in flavor if you add the marshmallow root?

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  20. @Anonymous, The marshmallow root has no effect on flavor.

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  21. Can these be frozen at all..? Or will that ruin them?
    Thanks for a great recipe! I'm on the SCD diet and these are legal if I leave out the marshmallow root.

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  22. @HeatherNM, No, these cannot be frozen.

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  23. I tried these but it didnt set firm. Any suggestions what I did wrong?

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  24. @Anonymous, It's hard to know since I wasn't there. Did you follow the recipe exactly? Did you use the right ingredients? Did you whip it long enough? I would just try it again. Good luck!

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  25. The only thing I did differently was that I doubled the recipe. I will attempt a smaller batch again. Thank you

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  26. Ever make these with vanilla beans?

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  27. Can these be used in place of store bought for rice krispy treats? and if so in what amount?

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  28. Hi Cristina,

    Thanks for sharing this simple, healthful recipe! The step-by-step photos are great, too. I wonder if you, or anyone else out there, has used freshly dug althaea officinalis root in place of the dried root? Also, have you, or others, experimented with a vegetarian or vegan version? We grow flax seed (as well as Marsh Mallow), so I'd love to find a way to use ingredients from our garden directly for these gorgeous little confections...

    Also, was very glad to see the pics and read the news about the March Against Monsanto in OKC. I attended the march in San Francisco: it was vibrant and relatively well attended. Our clear and consistent presence (now) will create a GMO-free future. I am grateful for all of your (and others') work toward this! Onward!!

    Thanks again -

    Karisa

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  29. Hi Karisa,

    I have not tried to use fresh marshmallow root, but I'm assuming you could just cut off a small piece and steep it in the boiling water. I think it's really neat that you grow your own marshmallow root. You don't hear of that very often.

    Cristina

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    1. I grow common mallow for the leaves... probably those roots would work as well as its cousin, marsh

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  30. Hello,

    We are on a whole food diet and my four year old son saw a tv show about camping and asked me to make smores. I immedietly turned to the internet to find a recipe without corn syrup. I have came across your site in the past so i decided to try out your recipe. I am so glad I chose to make them using your recipe! They are so good that I can not stop eating them! I cant wait to look through some of your other recipes! Thank you!

    Jessica

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  31. Have you tried roasting these? My girls love to roast marshmallows over our fire pit but I am wondering if these would just melt into goo? Thanks!

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  32. @Lindsay, These would melt. Natural sugars melt over heat.

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  33. Finally! A recipe with mallow. Marshmallows just don't taste the same without it. Thank you.

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  34. I'm unclear.... can we roast them over a fire or no?

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  35. @Anonymous, These would melt. Natural sugars melt over heat.

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  36. Can I just stir it with a spoon? I don't own those fancy stirring electrical things lol

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  37. Actually, the use of blue dye to whiten is not that odd. There's a laundry product called "bluette" (old and probably hard to find) that if used in small amounts will actually whiten your clothes. Too much and they'll turn blue, but just a touch and your whites turn super bright.

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  38. I hope they don't taste like they smell. I am using this gelatin for the first time and its pretty offensive.

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    1. Gelatin does not smell good, but you will not taste it and the smell will disappear.

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  39. You could save time and use a large pizza cutter coated in coconut oil to cut it. I love using my pizza cutter for things like that. I use it when I make my own chocolate (cocoa, maple syrup & coconut oil) and it's so much quicker.

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  40. I just made these. I did overmix by accident so it was difficult to spread out the fluff heh. Oops.
    Question though..... my marshmallows didn't turn white. They're lighter than what they started out as, but they're still this creamy eggshell off white tan color. Is that ok or does that mean I did something wrong? I followed the directions minus step 1 w/ the root.

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  41. What if my marshmallow root is in powder form? It's all I could find. I assume it might dissolve, so I won't be able to strain it out...

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    1. I think the powder should still work. Just stir to dissolve.I would use less, maybe use 2 tablespoons the first batch, and make sure it doesn't taste bad. You can add more the next time if it works out.

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  42. Just found u r wonderful site!! LOVE IT! ? on the marshmallows..........can I ADD caco to this to flavor the recipe for my gbabies?? TYIA............

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    1. Yes, you can! Add it in the same time as the vanilla. You probably only need a tablespoon or two.

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  43. Awesome recipe. Thanks Cristina. We exactly followed your steps and the result is incredible.
    You can make them a bit warm on the fire but you have to be careful.

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  44. Can I use these marshmallows to make fondant?

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    1. No, these won't work to make fondant. Marshmallows such as these that use real sugars melt over heat.

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  45. I made these and coated them in powdered sugar. When I put them into ball jars, they started to get gooey. I waited to coat them overnight. Wondering I did something wrong.

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  46. Any way to make rice crispy squares?

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  47. @wearlovewashrepeat: using straight-up powdered sugar does make them a little gummy, next time do half and half with a bit of tapioca starch (also known as arrowroot) and they should be less sticky!

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  48. Sweet! Can't wait to try these. My partner love marshmallows.

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  49. Thank you! I want to try these with orange blossom or rose water--do you think that would work to give these a fragrant flavor?

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    1. I actually have made these with rose water! I think I used half rose water and half water so they weren't overpowering. I liked them.

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  50. Mountain Rose, Inc doesn't sell Marshmallow root anymore (or perhaps out of stock), Would Marshmallow root powder work?

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  51. I made these yesterday and they are a hit. I am curious though, my honey and water mixture did not get to 240. I tried adding a cover to the pot, vented, and it still only would get to about 225. Is there something special about 240?

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    1. Around 235° F is when it hits the soft ball stage in candymaking. If it still worked for you at 225°, awesome! No harm done, I wouldn't worry about it.

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  52. I had the same problem when I heated the honey too. I waited an extra 10 minutes, got ADD, and started other things. Then I was reminded by the sizzling sound from the overflow. :/ At that point, I didnt wait for it to reach 240. I learned how to deal with it my second batch but, still doesnt get to 240.

    Now, Im no whiz when it comes to the chemistry of heating raw honey; does the honey retain any significant amount of nutrients after its heated? Is it acceptable to switch to refined honey? I love raw honey but like the other poster, I feel like it is such a shame to lose all the raw goodness.

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    1. Yes, the honey loses most of its nutrients. These are still lightyears above any marshmallow you can buy in the store, which are actively toxic.

      Yes, you can use refined honey. I use raw honey because it's all I keep in my house. I don't need refined honey for enough uses to keep it around.

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    2. I just used pure organic cane sugar. I don't see the point in spending that much on honey especially since it's heated to 240 degrees. The end result will be similar since you lose all the nutrients in the honey. Sugar is sugar.

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    3. All sugar is not created equal; regardless I use honey here because it produces a different tasting marshmallow than cane sugar. I love the flavor of a honey sweetened marshmallow.

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  53. OK…these look delicious! I know you said not to put them in the fridge but what about the freezer?

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    1. I did a test where I froze the marshmallows flat so as not to "smoosh" them, and then I thawed in the refrigerator, and the texture and flavor were perfect! I did not freeze them for long, so I'm not sure yet about freezing them long-term, but if you have a few marshmallows left and you want to prolong their life for at LEAST another day or two, it seems to be safe to stick them in the freezer. Mine thawed in the fridge in an hour or two. I LOVE these marshmallow so much, so I'm excited to think I can keep some in the freezer after making a batch!

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    2. Recently I made ice cream and I put my homemade marshmallows in it. It came out just fine.

      So apparently, it does work!

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  54. Thank you for sharing your hard work! With the fears of pesticides and gmo and who knows what else, it's so beautiful to not have to tell my daughter no to the foods most people eat, just that she has to wait for Mommy to cook it.

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  55. At what point do you add the vanilla?

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  56. Hi there,

    Am I able to make this using maple syrup or brown rice syrup instead of honey?

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    1. I'm not sure, as I have only made it with honey. You will just have to try it and find out.

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  57. Thanks for sharing! I linked to this post in my Glow Party series.

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  58. Hi, my fiancée can't have honey (it gives him bad headaches). What can I use instead of honey?

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  59. Just made them for my 4 yr old daughters birthday party. I am so totally thrilled! I used half the gelatin as I wanted more of a cream. They went firm though although they ran into a flat thin mass at first. I took cookie cutters and cut out shapes of teapots and hearts and the result was delightful. Perfect for her party. Thank you so much.

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  60. Can i add arrowroot powder for more structure or for roasting over camp fire? If so what step would i add it as and how much

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  61. Can I pay you to make them for me? Lol! But seriously, can I?!?

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